Reviews
“This was a band who enjoyed every second of being on stage. They were playing in front of those who appreciate their music and are as passionate about it as the members themselves. Songs of Dragons and the Devil were something very special and a brilliant example of Folk Rock at its best.” Elliot Grimes, Basingstoke Observer, May 2008, writing about a “Central Studio” concert
‘Kindred Spirit’ with their electro-folk prog-roots, also put on a fine show…loved their self-penned tunes like Meta- Mor-Phosis and Dragonfire. Band leader Elaine Samuels has a sweet yet powerful voice, well suited to the very English misty, moody and magical themes. Annie Parker adds some smoke and fire on flute, whilst Gavin Jones creates drama and majesty on electric violin…polished, meticulously crafted songs from this band. Neil Mach, for Staines weblog, Adpontes, writing about “Weyfest” 2009
“By the time their all-too-short set had finished, they’d turned quite a few heads in the crowd. The music they play is a haunting mix of folk rock, mixed in with a tinge of prog. In some ways they’re not too dissimilar to early 70s Canterbury band, Spirogyra, in their usage of sound textures, with the same instrumentation and ethereal melodies, and the way the violin brings it all together. Many bands have combined being regarded as a folk group with the incorporating of a prog sensitivity; bands like The Strawbs, Trees and, from Heavy Horses onwards, probably Jethro Tull. Kindred Spirt can now be included in this category. But Kindred Spirit also have their own distinct sound, featuring two lead instruments usually found in prog bands, violin and flute/sax. They’re also a band very likely not to stick to the script onstage and depart into improvisations, with the lead instruments duelling with and bouncing off each other. The interplay between the two key instruments, with Catherine Dimmock on Flute & Sax, and Martin Ash’s violin, is an integral aspect of their on stage persona. In recent times, the band has supported Curved Air and Magenta, been reviewed in various rock magazines and were featured in Prog magazine in January 2017.” Laurence Todd, Classic Rock Society Magazine, writing about “A New Day Festival” 2017
Reviews
“This was a band who enjoyed every second of being on stage. They were playing in front of those who appreciate their music and are as passionate about it as the members themselves. Songs of Dragons and the Devil were something very special and a brilliant example of Folk Rock at its best.” Elliot Grimes, Basingstoke Observer, May 2008, writing about a “Central Studio” concert
‘Kindred Spirit’ with their electro-folk prog-roots, also put on a fine show…loved their self-penned tunes like Meta-Mor-Phosis and Dragonfire. Band leader Elaine Samuels has a sweet yet powerful voice, well suited to the very English misty, moody and magical themes. Annie Parker adds some smoke and fire on flute, whilst Gavin Jones creates drama and majesty on electric violin…polished, meticulously crafted songs from this band. Neil Mach, Staines weblog, Adpontes, writing of “Weyfest” 2009
“By the time their all-too-short set had finished, they’d turned quite a few heads in the crowd. The music they play is a haunting mix of folk rock, mixed in with a tinge of prog. In some ways they’re not too dissimilar to early 70s Canterbury band, Spirogyra, in their usage of sound textures, with the same instrumentation and ethereal melodies, and the way the violin brings it all together. Many bands have combined being regarded as a folk group with the incorporating of a prog sensitivity; bands like The Strawbs, Trees and, from Heavy Horses onwards, probably Jethro Tull. Kindred Spirt can now be included in this category. But Kindred Spirit also have their own distinct sound, featuring two lead instruments usually found in prog bands, violin and flute/sax. They’re also a band very likely not to stick to the script onstage and depart into improvisations, with the lead instruments duelling with and bouncing off each other. The interplay between the two key instruments, with Catherine Dimmock on Flute & Sax, and Martin Ash’s violin, is an integral aspect of their on stage persona. In recent times, the band has supported Curved Air and Magenta, been reviewed in various rock magazines and were featured in Prog magazine in January 2017.” Laurence Todd, Classic Rock Society Magazine, writing about “A New Day Festival” 2017